Candide

Everyone’s favorite idiot, Candide, is a character in another of the most reissued books of all time. I’m sure Voltaire would have something witty to say about each of these editions.

First, the original. This first edition was issued in 1759, by Cramer. Prints were quickly copied and made into the knock-off “17 editions” of Candide. Silly counterfeiters.

This is a fairly nondescript edition from 1884, issued by Routledge.

This is my second favorite edition, and if I had $650 to throw around, I’d buy it immediately. It’s a flash image and I couldn’t find a photo of it anywhere else, so if you want, you can follow the link. It’s from 1928, by Nilsson.

Then Random House issued this reprint in 1928, with illustrations by Rockwell Kent:

That illustration is not for the faint of heart.

Random House reissued this print in 1975. Little changed, so I guess it sold well.

Then we have my favorite one: The Folio Society’s edition. It sold for $375.00 and only 1000 copies were printed. For shame. Though I’m not sure how I would feel about acquiring a $375.00 version of a work I could get for $5.00 from Dover Classics.

Speaking of which, here’s my copy, the infamously ugly Dover Classics edition from 1991.

I hate that version. What’s with the weird marbled effect on the cover? Not to mention the actual contents of the book. What a shoddy translation. Don’t buy this one. Go for either of these two:

Penguin Classics from 2005 and 2009 respectively.

And this is only a selection. There are loads of other versions. Too many, I think, for the average reader. How does one know what translation will be accurate? Each of these touts itself as an informative edition. The Dover one certainly wasn’t.

If anyone knows someone at Europa, put in a good word for me! I’m applying for their winter internship. Internships seem to be just as competitive as jobs now. Hopefully I’ll get one…

Cheers!

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The Blue Fairy Book

Right now, I’m working on a feature-length screenplay adaptation of the fable Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain, one of my favorite childhood stories. I highly recommend you follow the link and read it, as it’s one of those fables you just can’t help but like. I was hopeful to find the story in another Norwegian anthology, but I had trouble locating a decent one. The search eventually led me to one of the best fairytale collections of all time (I’m sure you all know what I’m talking about): The Blue Fairy Book, by Andrew Lang.

Andrew Lang has written a ton of fairy books, all different colors (there’s even an olive fairy book!), all with collected short fables from around the world. I wish I had this when I was little (we had a Norwegian collection that only contained four longer fairy tales and the Hans Christian Anderson collection)!

I thought that since I spend roughly five hours a day pouring over a fairytale, it would be nice to do a quick post about the beautiful cover art that has adorned Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book over the decades.

This is the original 1889 edition, published by Longmans, Green, and Co of London. Henry Justice Ford did the illustrations (one from East of the Sun, West of the Moon, another short Norwegian fairytale, is at the bottom of the post).

 

 

 

 

This is followed by the David Mckay edition of 1921. Slightly less whimsical and a bit more cartoonish, but still cute. I prefer the original, but who doesn’t? Usually the first editions are always the most tasteful.

 

 

 

 

Then we have the Dover Classics edition from 1965. This one is pretty blah. It’s boring and the color blue they chose is a bit too pale.

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, there’s the 2003 edition from Folio of London. I really like this one. It is bound in the style of the 1890s and tries to imitate the feeling of the original illustrations. I prefer this color blue (a little less cornflower) than that of the Dover version. I also really like the details on the spine.

 

 

Not to mention the interior! The illustrations are gorgeous.

Henry Justice Ford's illustration from the 1889 version

I love fairytales. Now it’s off to edit my own (which, by the way, takes place in Nazi-era Norway and involves soldiers and wolves. It promises to be highly entertaining). Cheers!