Neverwhere

I am a huge Neil Gaiman fan. He was the author that first introduced me to urban fantasy, my favorite genre, and subsequently I found a name for the sort of fiction I wrote, and a clan of followers. This was all before Stardust was released on DVD and everyone and their mothers were reading Sandman. Not to say publicity isn’t good, but now he’s become kind of a bad writer (I hated Fragile Things, it was so boring. Not at all similar to Smoke and Mirrors). I think it’s really easy to fall back on popularity and put out whatever you can when you’re a megasuperstar. He really is the Thom Yorke of non-literary fiction these days.

That said, I’m doing Neverwhere today, which I’m sure most of you know, and for those who don’t, it follows this guy who stumbles across a strange girl named Door, who has magical powers and can open any door she comes across. She takes him to London Below, which is basically London, but underground and spooky. She has to find out who killed her family. They meet the Marquis of Carabas (who is my favorite character), the token character that employs dry wit to give a humorous edge to some scenes. It’s a great, great book. Do read it if you haven’t.

Neverwhere has been released so many times in the past fifteen or so years that the number of copies available (or not available) is pretty large. I guess he didn’t really boom in popularity until five or so years ago, so maybe that’s why.

BBC Books, 1996.

Avon, 1998.

William Morrow, 2003.

Review, 2005.

This one is a comic book, but nonetheless has furthered the Neverwhere franchise.

Titan Books, 2007. (Comic)

William Morrow, 2010. Special Edition, 1000 prints.

The latter edition was a special release, only sold for 2 days, and cost $200. All the copies were signed and were printed 7×10. It was the “author’s preferred” text, which I assume means the UK version (the US publisher cut out 2000 words). Kind of like a Director’s cut, I suppose (see post on film and publishing!)

And I’m not counting the foreign editions, of which many exist. I found a photo of the French version:

You can look at all the foreign additions here.

There’s also a DVD release and several audio CDs, though I won’t get into that here. I’ve never seen the Neverwhere miniseries, so any opinion I could give you would be highly uneducated.

Does anyone else love this book as much as I do?

Cheers!

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Bella’s Favorite Books

I find this marketing campaign despicable, but incredibly effective:

HarperCollins Teen released new editions of three old classics way back in 2009, each of which was mentioned in Twilight as one of Bella’s favorite books (if you’ve missed out on the Twilight phenomenon, you must live under a rock, so I’ll let you dust the dirt off your laptop and find out about it elsewhere). I don’t know about you, but I was rather saddened to see three solid classics adorned with blatant Twilight-knock-off covers.

It’s not that they’re badly done, because really, they’re not. If you think about it from the point of view of a publicity agent, this is actually a really smart move. They’re basically marketing these three books as a continuation of the Twilight series–the blurb on the front of P&P says, “The love that started it all,” which to me implies that this is supposed to be a prelude to Bella/Edward’s relationship, and that these two novels have common ground. Of course, anyone who has read P&P knows that Darcy and Edward are nothing alike and that Bella and Elizabeth aren’t either, but the average teen probably hasn’t read it.

I’m sure Harper Collins Teen claims that these covers will induce more children to read, but really, if it takes a marketing scheme based on one of the most overrated books in existence (not to mention one of the most flawed and poorly written), then I don’t think there’s much hope for the masses of the coming generations.

Of course, I hope that’s not true. I like to think that reading will continue to be a staple of everyday life for the next few centuries, and that ideas will continue to spread through the written word. Popular culture is extinguishing my hope for this (by the way, have you looked at children’s handwriting these days? Thanks to computers, they have the worst penmanship I’ve ever seen) but I do see the point behind this campaign.

“Love never dies”? Really? And “The original forbidden love”? Spare me.

Well Harper Collins, I will commend you. I hope that entices you to read over my application to be your editorial assistant, despite the fact I just disparaged your company.

Cheers and have a good Saturday!