Pride and Prejudice

It’s about time I got around to writing about P&P!

I’m doing a paper on the cover art for the novel, so it seems only logical that I would do a post on it too. After all, I spend an hour a day reading sources about publishing in the 1800s versus publishing now, so it’s gonna be easy as pie!

I have to say, I love P&P. I think it’s chick lit–yep, sorry guys, I’m not convinced of its status as English Literature–but I love it anyway. It’s quite amusing and if I want to chuckle a little while reading, this is the book I pick to read.

So let’s begin!

Original edition, 1813, T Egerton.

1895, George Allen, UK.

1897, Dana Estes and Co, Boston.

1900, Gresham Pub. and Co., UK

1908, JM Dent, UK

You can tell how frequently they were being re-released. The demand for Austen’s books grew far later on in the century.

1930, T Nelson and Co., London. Part of the Nelson’s Favorite Books series. I guess by the 1930s Austen was already being considered a favorite.

1940, Pocket Books.   A mini version of the book for the WWII soldiers to carry around with them in battle.

 

 

1948, Scholastic. This one wins the weirdest cover award.

 

1966, Airmont. Sorry for the rotten photo, I couldn’t find a better one.

1981, Bantham.  BOOOORRING.

1993, Longman. So pretty.

2007, Bethany House. Some of my friends have told me that this is a “christian” version of P&P. I don’t really know what that is supposed to mean…?

 

2009, Penguin Classics. By far the coolest one. Follow the link to see the other classics this artist has done.

 

 

So there you have it–a brief run-through of some of the hundreds of covers of P&P. I left out the Twilight version, as I had posted about it already.

I also left out my copy, because it’s ugly as sin. When you’re poor, you just buy whatever edition you can find at the secondhand bookstore.

Cheers!

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One thought on “Pride and Prejudice

  1. In primary school I ordered P&P as a $2 special through Scholastic Book Club as I thought it was “a book I should probably read.” The 1948 edition turned up and I wondered what I’d gotten myself into – definitely judging a book by its cover! – evidently stock of the cover they’d advertised had run out. Now, of the 4 copies I have that one is the most well worn and loved because I take it with me everywhere – best $2 ever spent! 🙂

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